17 Weeks Pregnant: Hello little bump
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17 weeks pregnant: Pregnancy tips and nutrition

Your 17 week pregnancy bump may begin to show, but it may not. Every woman is different and it can be weeks before some mums are showing. Slow and steady weight gain during pregnancy is best so, for tips on keeping a healthy weight, read on.

In Pregnancy

    4-minutes read

    At a glance

    Baby talk. Baby can hear you and feel your pats, coughs and laughs

    Keep active. Many fitness routines can be made bump-friendly. Just ask your instructor

     

    Not all fats are bad. Omega 3 fatty acids are vital for your growing baby

    Check with your doctor to see which medications are safe

    Baby's development at 17 weeks pregnant

    This week baby is about the size of a luscious pomegranate. The development of your baby’s nervous system is making her more aware of sounds, light and movement from the outside world. She could even start responding to pats, rubs and loud laughter. Next time you go dancing, she may well answer with her very own cha-cha-cha.

    Her tact corpuscles, aka touch receptors, are also growing all over her body and they’ll keep growing until around week 20. The nerve fibres of her spinal cord are being protected by myelin, rich in lipids and very helpful for good nerve conduction. Also, her intestines which are still growing, have finally settled in their rightful place – her abdomen.

    Changes in you and your body at 17 weeks pregnant

    What to expect at 17 weeks pregnant? For starters, it’s different for everyone. Some mums-to-be see a cute little baby bump beginning to show and the pregnancy might be more visible. It can be an exciting time as things start to feel more real. If you’re slim or you’ve had a baby before, it’s possible that you’re showing early, but some women don’t show for another few weeks. Either way, those skin-tight jeans will most likely be feeling a bit snug.

    But the good news is you may start to feel baby moving by now. In the early days you’ll just feel little flutters or a bubbly sensation, no it’s not indigestion, it’s baby saying a first little hello. If you’re struggling to feel anything don’t worry, it can be weeks before some women get the slightest flutter, and even then it can be very subtle and easily missed. Try relaxing in a quiet room and tuning in to your body.

    Also, a good way to tune in to your body is through gentle pregnancy exercises and pregnancy yoga, but check with your GP or midwife first. For any instructor-led activity, ensure they are qualified to teach and let them know that you are pregnant.

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    Nutrition at 17 weeks pregnant

    Fats and essential fatty acids are an important part of your pregnancy diet. Omega 3 fats, important for brain function and normal growth and development, are found in oily fish like salmon. Just remember to keep to limits with Tuna and steer clear of fish containing mercury like swordfish, marlin or sh…sh…shark. No fried food either, please.

    Veggie or Vegan? There are plenty of delicious non-meat alternatives to fats and fatty acids like avocados, pulses and soybean, flax seed, chia seed and walnuts.

    Coping with flu during pregnancy

    You’ll be lucky to get away without getting a cold during pregnancy and it’s totally understandable if when you do, you get a little worried for baby. A common cold or a stomach upset usually won’t harm your little one, but before you reach for those painkillers make sure you check with your GP or pharmacist.

    Some harmless-looking remedies, even over-the-counter ones, can affect baby, so it’s really important to be sure that what you’re taking is safe for them.

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    Tips and nutrition at 16 weeks pregnant

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    Important advice to mothers

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life. SMA® Nutrition fully supports this and continued breastfeeding, along with the introduction of complementary foods as advised by your healthcare professional.